Chris Carr

Guiding Activities: (Activity 1)

A simple class survey should be taken prior to the start of this project to determine student background knowledge. The results should be evaluated and then decide which broad topics need to be explained and modeled before group work begins.

In an attempt to review and also practice and learn poetry reading and writing skills the following activity should be completed first.

Guiding Question:

  • What is Poetry?

  1. Students will discuss the guiding question in groups and then report back to the class as to the details of their discussion.
  2. The results will be listed on the Smartboard so that the data can be discussed and analyized. For this project four specific types of poetry will be highlighted: Cinquain, Haiku, Limerick and Free Verse
  3. Students will visit the website: http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/poetry/poetry_engine.htm# and learn about four forms of poetry: Cinquain, Haikiu, Limerick, and Free Verse.
  4. Students will learn to define each type of poetry, read examples and then create their own practice version via a template on the site. The animated nature of the site makes this learning/review/practice fun and unique. Students may print a personal version of each type of poem created on this site for further reference.
  5. Students will continue to research these 4 types of poetry and choose one type to create a personal poem using an interactive template on Educational Technology Training Center website: http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm Students may print this personal version for use in part 2 of the guided activity.
  6. Students will come back to their groups to share and critique the poems they have created via the interactive sites. Students will make personal comments and observations about each other’s poetry as well as comments based on the poetry rubrics. (Item 8)
  7. Students will create a Voicethread for a poem they have chosen. Each group will create their own Voicethread in which their published poem will appear in written form and also be orally recited by the author.
  8. Poetry Rubrics:
Cinquain:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=K64B39&sp=true
Haiku:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=A54X4X&sp=yes&
Limerick:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=X3AWA9&sp=true
Free Verse:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=G49727&sp=yes&

Voicethread Example:
Sample VoiceThread Poem


Guiding Activity (Activity 2)

Guiding Questions:

What are the similarities between Poetry and other forms of artistic expression?
How can images and words together enhance the feeling or meaning of a poem?

Guiding Activity:

  1. Students will discuss the guiding questions and share their thoughts with the class.
  2. The thoughts will be displayed on the Smartboard and listed for reference.
  3. Group members will take turns reading their chosen poem from activity 1. As the poem is recited the group members will write down or sketch the most vivid image that is created through their “mind’s eye”.
  4. Illustrations are pictures. Similar to pictures, poetry paints ideas using words and Illustrations use images to paint our ideas. Students will use the same poem from the first guided activity and create an image or illustration inspired by the poems literary elements. The students can choose to use the group's suggestions or develop their own interpretation of the poem.
  5. Group members will close their eyes and try to visualize an image based on a number of book titles. One group member should read the following book titles aloud: Bump in the Night, Charlotte's Web, The Snowy Day, The Polar Express, The Mitten, and The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
  6. Students will then view and discuss the impact of illustrations on the book's title based on the book cover artwork.
  7. Bump in the Night by ED Hemingway
  8. Charlotte's Web By E.B. White
  9. The Snowy Day By Ezra Jack Keats
  10. The Polar Express By Chris Van Allsburg
  11. The Mitten By Jan Brett
  12. The Very Hungry Caterpillar By Eric Carle
  13. Students will choose an artistic medium such as Painting, drawing, collage/cut paper, marker, oil pastel and digital photography. All of these media are reflected in the chosen examples of illustrated children's books.
  14. Students will create an original piece of artwork to accompany and support their chosen poem.
  15. Primary Level Art Problem Solving Assessment Rubric (Scroll to bottom of the page to view rubric)
  16. The finished piece will be added to the VoiceThread. Once all poetry and illustrations are published, students will visit three of their classmate's threads and comment based on the guiding questions. This will provide feedback to each author/illustrator and help to answer the guiding questions and build on the class discussion.
  17. The culminating activity will be to publish all of the class and group work to Voicethread and invite others outside of the classroom to view and comment on the results. This will provide additional summative data for the students using an authentic audience.

    Sample VoiceThread with poem and Illustration

Resources:
Activity 1
http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/poetry/poetry_engine.htm#
http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm
Cinquain:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=K64B39&sp=true
Haiku:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=A54X4X&sp=yes&
Limerick:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=X3AWA9&sp=true
Free Verse:
http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=G49727&sp=yes&
Voicethread Example:
https://voicethread.com/share/2753332/

Activity 2
Illustration Examples:
  1. Bump in the Night by ED Hemingway
  2. Charlotte's Web By E.B. White
  3. The Snowy Day By Ezra Jack Keats
  4. The Polar Express By Chris Van Allsburg
  5. The Mitten By Jan Brett
  6. The Very Hungry Caterpillar By Eric Carle
  7. Primary Level Art Problem Solving Assessment Rubric
    Sample VoiceThread with poem and Illustration